Can Buprenorphine Be Snorted?

The multiple, all-encompassing consequences that trail substance abuse in the United States call for drastic, effective interventions. Largely, limiting the widespread availability of commonly misused substances remains a practical approach to curtailing substance abuse prevalence in the nation. Nevertheless, addiction treatment services also play a significant role in supporting chemically dependent people to reclaim their lives.

Medication-assisted therapy (MAT) is a module that forms part of most recovery plans. It is a proven strategy for helping addicted people to stick to and ace their abstinence goals during and after recovery. Detox sessions across numerous substances, such as opioids, alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana, adopt MAT as their benchmark. Buprenorphine and Methadone are widely known medications incorporated into the recovery modules of opioid-dependent individuals. While buprenorphine can be snorted, doing so is against how the medication is prescribed and can spiral into drug abuse and dependency very quickly.

Can Buprenorphine Be Snorted?

About Buprenorphine

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) endorses Buprenorphine for Opioid Use Disorder treatment.  Opioid Detox Programs use this medication as a safer, longer-lasting alternative to conventional opioids. Buprenorphine, apart from being prescribed for opioid addiction, may also be used as pain relief. Although the drug may exist independently, it is more commonly administered in combinations with naloxone under the trade names, Suboxone, Subutex, Bunavail, or Zubsolv.

Buprenorphine is an opioid partial agonist. It produces similar effects as opioids when consumed. However, unlike other opioids, it does this with little or no unfortunate outcomes. The drug primarily enables opioid-dependent individuals to circumvent the tragic withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting opioid use. It also lessens their risk for relapse after periods of opioids abstinence.

The Right Way to Use Buprenorphine

Although not all substance-dependent individuals may be aware, the route adopted to consume a substance or medication is an essential aspect of its use. When using buprenorphine, one must adhere strictly to the dosages and instructions given by medical personnel. Failure to follow these directives may bring about diverse consequences, including severe withdrawal symptoms and relapse.

Buprenorphine is often taken orally as sublingual or buccal tablets and films. Addiction Specialists who recommend it for Medication-assisted therapy advise against taking the medication via other routes. Consequently, snorting is not a recommended route for buprenorphine administration. Buprenorphine can be snorted but this quickly leads to addiction and misuse of the medication.

Individuals on buprenorphine prescription may experience some side effects, including constipation, nausea, drowsiness, dry mouth, and weight gain.

The Effects of Buprenorphine Abuse

Although the chances of overdosing on buprenorphine are slim, chemically dependent people, who mix the medication with other substances may suffer an overdose. Perhaps out of sheer curiosity or ignorance, people combine buprenorphine with other substances, such as alcohol or Librium. Those who misuse buprenorphine this way suffer withdrawal symptoms or the subtle lure towards relapse.

Finding Help for Substance Dependence

Mid Hudson Addiction Recovery can assist you in charting a clear path through your addiction. Suppose you seek support on how best to use buprenorphine or wondering what services are available to help you deal with an addiction. In that case, you can count on us. Our Addiction Professionals are renowned for their unique ability to recommend best-fit recovery services that yield anticipated outcomes. You can begin your recovery journey right away. Give us a call today to book an appointment.

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